Aboriginal Traineeship Program: A conversation with our trainees – part 2 - Amber Ugle-Hayward

News story
Tyler McMiles and Amber Ugle-Hayward are two participants in this year’s program. They’ve been working hard in their agencies, growing as young public sector leaders while making progress towards their final goal – completing a Certificate III in Government.
Aboriginal Traineeship Program

Tyler McMiles and Amber Ugle-Hayward are two participants in this year’s Aboriginal Traineeship Program. They’ve been working hard in their agencies, growing as young public sector leaders while making progress towards their final goal – completing a Certificate III in Government. We got in touch with them to find out about their experience so far and what they have learnt during the 2020 program…

 

Part 2 - Amber Ugle-Hayward

Amber Ugle-Hayward’s decision to apply for the Public Sector Commission’s Aboriginal Traineeship Program was not made lightly. After a false start in 2019, and a short stint in the private sector, Amber accepted a placement in the 2020 program and has not looked back since.

“I graduated high school in 2017 and applied for the Aboriginal Traineeship Program later that year for the 2018/2019 intake, but decided to get experience as a bank teller instead,” Amber said.

“I jumped at the chance to take part in the program this time around. It has been a career defining opportunity and allowed me to get a kick start in government.”

Amber Ugle-Hayward

The traineeship is one of a number of important programs run by the Public Sector Commission that provides an entry-level pathway for a career in public service, and the opportunity to gain unique experience in a new work environment.

A ‘new work environment’ that Amber says she loves.

Based at the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage in the Lands Division’s Property and Risk Management Team, Amber decided to apply for an Aboriginal traineeship to develop her abilities and get a foot in the door in government.

“Ultimately, I want to build on my professional career prospects and gain a better idea of what I want to do long term. I also want to maintain a network of people that I can look up to and get advice from.”

Like many young people, Amber initially thought working in government was just a standard office job. Her mind quickly changed however, when she started to learn about the diverse and interesting projects her department was responsible for. She also appreciated how her team, and especially her manager, took Amber under their wing.

“Everyone is welcoming and supportive of what you want to gain out of this experience but my manager is honestly one of the best people to work with. She’s like a mentor and supervisor rolled into one, which makes me love working here even more.”

A typical day for Amber involves assisting her colleagues with administrative duties such as looking after State-owned land (or ‘Crown Land’, she tells us) leases and inspection letters, scanning and saving records, and keeping outstanding tasks up to date.

“I’ve learnt so much. I’ve learnt that we help preserve historical buildings, maintain Crown land and promote innovative ideas to better WA.”

The Aboriginal Traineeship Program is one of the ways the Commission is working to create a future-fit, collaborative and diverse public sector, and help today’s young people develop the skills to be tomorrow’s public sector leaders.

“Not every trainee is the same and because of this it allows the workforce to be exposed to different cultures, languages and beliefs within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage,” Amber said.

Applications for the 2021 Aboriginal Traineeship Program are open until 9 October 2020.

Page reviewed 14 September 2020