Speeding

The faster you travel, the longer it takes to stop and the larger the risk of serious injury. Information about speeding, radar detectors and related penalties and offences.

It’s simple. The faster you travel, the longer it takes to stop.

Chequered flag background: 'Can you stop in time?'

Speed is the biggest killer on our roads. In 2020, 47% of fatalities in 2020 were in crashes in 110 km/h speed zones. Between 2016 and 2020, 1662 people were killed or seriously injured in speed-related crashes.

If you do crash, the speed at which you are travelling impacts the risk of injury to you, your passengers and other road users.

For every 5km/h increase in travelling speed in a 60km/h zone, the risk of being injured in a crash doubles. At 65km/h the chance of having a crash resulting in injury doubles, it’s four times more likely at 70km/h and the risk increases by 32 times at 80km/h.

Your stopping distance due to speeding could be the difference between someone escaping with little more than a scare and a pedestrian losing their life.

  • Reaction distance is the distance you travel between seeing a problem and hitting the brakes. If you’re not distracted you’ll react in 1.5 seconds. If you’re doing 60km/h, you’ll still travel 25 metres in the time it takes for the message to get from your brain to your foot.
  • Braking distance is the number of metres you travel between hitting the brakes and coming to a complete stop. You’ll cover another 20 metres before this happens, assuming you’re driving on a dry road, in a newer car with good tyres and brakes.
  • Stopping distance is the distance when you add your reaction distance to your braking distance. If you’re doing 60km/h, you should come to a stop within 45 metres. If you are speeding, it is easy to see that 5km/hr over the speed limit, will greatly impact your ability to brake in time to avoid a crash.

In Western Australia, 100% of all red light and speed camera infringements go into the Road Trauma Trust Account. Those funds are then allocated to improve road safety across WA.

Offences and Penalties

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(All offences below are subject to double demerit point penalties.)

See our Double Demerit information for more.

Speeding by light vehicles

Cars, motorcycles, and other vehicles less than 22.5 tonnes Gross Combination Mass.

Km/h over the speed limit   Penalty Demerits
Not more than 9 km/h  $100 0
More than 9km/h but not more than 19 km/h $200 2
More than 19 km/h but not more than 29 km/h $400 3
More than 29 km/h but not more than 40 km/h $800 6
More than 40 km/h $1,200 7

Speeding by heavy vehicles

Vehicles with a Gross Combination Mass of 22.5 tonnes or more.

Km/h over the speed limit   Penalty Demerits
Not more than 9 km/h  $200 0
More than 9km/h but not more than 19 km/h $300  2
More than 19 km/h but not more than 29 km/h $500 3
More than 29 km/h but not more than 40 km/h $1,200 6
More than 40 km/h $1,500 7

 

Radar Detector and Speed Camera Evasion Equipment

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WA drivers caught with a radar detector, radar jammer or any device for evading speed cameras are subject to hefty penalties, even if the device is not switched on. The penalties also apply to drivers of vehicles with a radar detector in a trailer or caravan that their vehicle is towing.

Driving with a radar detector fitted to, within or on the vehicle – operational or not

Offence Penalty Demerits
Driving a heavy vehicle. $1,500 7
Driving a motor vehicle other than a heavy vehicle. $1,200 7

Driving with any device that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment

Offence Penalty Demerits
Driving a heavy vehicle $1,500
Driving a motor vehicle other than a heavy vehicle $1,200

Driving in a manner that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment

Offence Penalty Demerits
Driving a heavy vehicle $1,500
Driving a motor vehicle other than a heavy vehicle $1,200

 

Average Speed Safety Camera Zone

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The zone operates on Forrest Highway (between Mandurah & Bunbury) in both directions.

How does it work?

Let’s say a speeding driver is heading towards the Safety Camera Zone. Once the driver enters the zone, a camera will record an image of the vehicle. Another image will be taken when the vehicle exits the zone. These images measure the vehicle’s:

1) Entry speed
 If the vehicle exceeds the posted speed limit at this point, a speeding infringement may be issued;
2) Exit speed
If the vehicle exceeds the posted speed limit at this point, a speeding infringement may be issued, and;
3) Average speed between the two cameras
 If the vehicle’s average speed exceeds the posted speed limit, a speeding infringement may be issued.

If you are caught speeding in the zone, you will receive at least one infringement. However, a decision on enforcement will be made by WA Police based on the nature of the speeding offence.

Saving lives

Speeding increases the chances of a crash, as well as the likelihood of serious injury or death in a crash. Our research shows that speed cameras make drivers slow down, help reduce the road toll and lower the chances of having a crash.  Average Speed Safety Cameras are another tool to help save lives and make WA roads safer.

For more information, see our Average Speed Safety Camera Zone Fact Sheet.

Announcements

News story

We’re watching you – Behind the scenes

Constable Mmuluki Moyo of the Western Australia Police Force knows first hand the trauma associated with road crashes where speed is determined to be a factor.
Page reviewed 25 November 2021